Sunday, May 28, 2017

Weekly Links: meal kits, Ascension Day, and more!




~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING, FOR WHAT'S LEFT OF YOUR WEEKEND ~


FAITH

-"Ascension Day and the Death of Bede": This account of the death of the venerable Bede was very moving.




FAmily

-"Summer Screen Time": I really love the ideas here. I think I want to adapt it for our family.


-"Drowning Doesn't Look Like Drowning": I'm sure I linked to this last summer -- it's a reprint -- but as summer approaches, and the swimming pool beckons, it's worth rereading. Stay safe out there!


-"We At Meal Kits for a Month - Here's What We Learned": I'm fascinated by the meal kit subscription trend, but I've always been pretty sure I can do it better at home. It's just possible that I like this article because it, 1) caters to my fascination, and, 2) confirms my suspicion.




Fiction

-"Literature as Equipment for Living: The Case of The Man Who Was Thursday": an article that chases an answer to the question: "What type of artistic diet will prepare Christians for life in this world?" 


-"Tips from Industry Pros: Before and After a Conference": 'Tis the season -- for writing conferences! If you're headed to one this summer, you'll probably appreciate this article.


-"Secretly a Rocketship": very short, very punchy piece of flash fiction. So well done. (Make sure to hit the "Display Entire Story" button at the bottom of the page, or you'll miss the ending.)


-"Story Climax": a useful article on finishing off your fiction.



OTHER COOL STUFF

-"Seeing Boundaries From Space": this photo essay (essay with lots of photos?) is fascinating. It's about looking at the liminal places of our world from outer space.






I hope you have a lovely Sunday, full of worship and rest!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell

Friday, May 26, 2017

Book Notes: "Lord Peter: The Complete Lord Peter Wimsey Stories," by Dorothy L. Sayers



"Lord Peter: The Complete Lord Peter Wimsey Stories," by Dorothy L. Sayers, was the end of my read (and, in most cases, re-read) through the Wimsey books.

And this is the point where, instead of writing a proper post, I'm tempted just to sigh the sigh of a deeply-contented reader, and let that be enough.

But, I'll resist that temptation. Here are a few notes on what I noticed this time through the collection:


-In these short stories, I kept noticing echoes of her novels. It was as if some of the short stories had bits of DNA that eventually were cultured/adapted/incorporated into larger entities. For example, the beach-and-sand-and-footprints clues in The Unsolved Puzzle of the Man with No Face felt like a bit of a trial run for some of the "how'd he do it?" questions in the novel Have His Carcase.


-In some of the stories, Lord Peter didn't really feel like Lord Peter. It felt like Sayers had an idea for a nifty little puzzle, and she had Lord Peter solve it because he was the character to hand, not because it was a puzzle he'd be naturally drawn to solving. For example, in The Adventurous Exploit of the Cave of Ali Baba, Lord Peter goes incognito in order to infiltrate a mysterious society, but it felt like you could have substituted any other determined, well-financed, brilliant gumshoe into his place, and the story wouldn't have changed much.


-In some of the stories, Lord Peter is ABSOLUTELY Lord Peter, and couldn't be anyone else. I mean, the opening of The Haunted Policeman is not only my favorite opening of a short story ever, but no one but Lord Peter and Harriet could have ever had that conversation.


-Speaking of Lord Peter and Harriet: the domestic story of Talboys is just wonderful. I love it so much.


Should you read this? Yes, of course you should. Stop asking such silly questions.


Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell

This post contains Amazon affiliate links; if you purchase a book from this link, I receive a small percentage of the purchase price.  (See full disclosure on sidebar of my blog.)

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Bag-End Bunny ("Sophie" by Ysolda Teague)




My brother and his wife are expecting their first child, and I really wanted to make something for my new nephew. I thought about making a blanket, but my sister-in-law is a fantastic knitter, and was already making her baby a gorgeous blanket.

So, I started thinking about what else I could make him, and remembered another baby shower I'd been to once, where a friend had knitted a really adorable stuffed elephant for the new baby.

Reader, I was inspired. I went to my friend's Ravelry page, and found the elephant pattern, and it turned out it was by Ysolda Teague, so I started looking at Ysolda's other patterns, and there was one in particular that I loved.


So I made a bunny. Isn't he cute?

The pattern for the bunny is "Sophie." It's really well-written, which is good, because there were some really tricky bits (I broke two separate needles), and having clear instructions kept me from getting frustrated during the difficult bits.

But the part I'm REALLY proud of his little sweater. I designed it myself, and it's removable, see?




I'm so pleased with how this turned out! I don't think I've ever winged a design like this before in knitting--only in crochet. But I might do more of it now, because it was really fun!


Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell

Monday, May 22, 2017

Book Notes: "The Magic Mirror: Concerning a Lonely Princess, a Foundling Girl, a Scheming King and a Pickpocket Squirrel," by Susan Hill Long



The Magic Mirror, by Susan Hill Long, was a recent read-aloud of ours, and it was a good one.

It's a children's fantasy, set in a medieval world, complete with a recognizably Catholic belief system. That background presence of religion was actually one of the things I enjoyed about the book; it's not that I agreed completely with the religious beliefs of any of the characters, but it just felt more like a real world when there were people of faith, common superstitions, churches as part of the urban landscape, etc. It was interesting to read about a world where God was God, and God was good, but there were still bits of minor magic floating about, almost as if they were just another bit of creation.

We follow our heroine, Maggie, as she sets off on an adventure. It's a travel story, with colorful characters who are (on purpose, I'd bet) reminiscent of Chaucer's pilgrims.

Maggie is our lodestar, and her plot is always foremost, but the author threw in so many other things! The book is full of side quests, complications, and minor characters. There's danger, and dire deeds, and I appreciated that the author didn't gloss over the evilness of the villains or the foibles of the heroes, BUT she also never wallowed in any of the bad stuff, nor did she write about it in a way that's inappropriate for school-age kids.

(Note: There's definitely stuff here that you'd want to talk through with your kids--I'm not saying it's void of troubling or controversial content. But I found that it was all presented in a way that sparked good conversation with my kids, and not in a way that left me feeling like I had to do damage control. And that's something I like in kids' books. YMMV.)

I really enjoyed this one, though I found it odder than I expected. Occasionally that oddity felt irritating, but mostly it just made for an engaging, colorful tale. My kids were fascinated by the characters, and crowed at all the plot reveals as the story progressed. Recommended.



Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell


This post contains Amazon affiliate links; if you purchase a book from this link, I receive a small percentage of the purchase price.  (See full disclosure on sidebar of my blog.)

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Weekly Links


~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING, FOR WHAT'S LEFT OF YOUR WEEKEND ~


FAith

-"How I Leverage My Autism for Pastoral Ministry": My own Aspie (HFA) kid read this and was encouraged by it. I can't give it a higher recommendation than that--it's a great article.




FAMILY

-"Sudoko vs. 4x4: Choosing a Capsule Type": I find capsule wardrobes fascinating, and this article actually shows you how to design your own (as opposed to just imitating someone else's).



Fiction

-"Five Ways to Fix the Marvel Cinematic Universe": I gotta say, I especially appreciate #5.


-"The Key Book Publishing Paths: 2017": If you're an author, you'll appreciate this clear layout of the different kinds of publishing that are out there right now.


-"5 Ways to Maximize Your Writing Time": I thought the "pre-rough-draft" idea was especially interesting.


-"Interview: Megan Whalen Turner, Author of the Queen's Thief Series": AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA! Finally, after seven years, there's a new Thief book. (Yes, I have it. Yes, I've started it. Yes, IT'S GOOD.)




I hope you have a lovely Sunday, full of worship and rest!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Weekly Links!


~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING, FOR WHAT'S LEFT OF YOUR WEEKEND ~


FAmily

-"How Ready Are You for the End of School: A Quiz": the first question is my life right now.



Fiction

-"7 Things I Learned About Starting a Career in Science Fiction"


-"Once Upon a Time Knitting Pattern Reference List" - if you like your crafting to be inspired by stories (stories on TV, in this case).


-"Reshaping the Bizarre Structure of Fairy Tales" - as someone currently working on a novel inspired by an old story, I enjoyed reading this.






I hope you have a lovely Sunday, full of worship and rest!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Book Notes: "The Wind in the Willows," by Kenneth Grahame




"The Wind in the Willows," by Kenneth Grahame is, of course, a classic. But it's a classic I hadn't read before (though I'd encountered bits of the chapter with Pan in various other publications).

It's a story about Mole, and his friends who live on or near the riverbank, particularly Rat and Toad and Badger.

I loved Mole. And I loved Rat, too, and I enjoyed and appreciated the venerable and valiant Badger.


I pretty much hated Toad, though, and I disliked almost every scene he was in.

I have a terrible feeling that the moral of the story is that We Are All Toad, and that we don't deserve the beautiful and joyous life on the riverbank, except that we have Friends who help us win back our Heritage, and so we are all Recipients of Grace, but... I still don't like Toad.

I expect I'll read "The Wind in the Willows" again. Because it is beautiful.


Except for the parts with Toad. Maybe I should be good enough to read those again.

But I don't think that I am.


Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell


This post contains Amazon affiliate links; if you purchase a book from this link, I receive a small percentage of the purchase price.  (See full disclosure on sidebar of my blog.)

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Weekly Links!


~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING, FOR WHAT'S LEFT OF YOUR WEEKEND ~

FAITH

God is God. He has the power and the plan and all will be well and jolly and good and beautiful in the end no matter what I do, but I can be a part of the jollification. God does not need me, but I can be there.

-"Family Worship as Spiritual Formation": This is one post from a really excellent new series over at Mere Orthodoxy.


-"On Family Worship and Failure": This is another.






Family

-"On the Outside"I know this was written to make me tear up. But...it worked.



Fiction



I hope you have a lovely Sunday, full of worship and rest!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell


Thursday, April 20, 2017

Look Where You Want to Go: Bible-reading and Mountain-Biking


My dad is a big mountain-biker. And because he was into mountain-biking, when we were kids, my sister and brother and I got into mountain-biking. Because we wanted to spend time with our dad.

And there’s something I learned during those years of biking: You Go Where You Look.

Sometimes Dad would take us on trails that were kinda scary: narrow-singletrack stuff with sharp drops on one or both sides of the trail. You’d think that you’d want to be hyper-aware of the dangerous part, that you’d want to really concentrate on the sharp cliffs, so that you could avoid them. But it turned out that the opposite was true: If you looked down the drop…that’s where you’d go.

You wanted to look straight ahead. You wanted to keep your eyes on the trail. Because it’s just this automatic thing: where your eyes look? That’s where you’d steer the bike.

So, reading the Bible is about looking at the trail. It’s looking where you want to go.


Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell




p.s.: RE: the picture. Yeah, I know about the rock song. I think the picture's funny anyway.

Monday, April 17, 2017

The Joy Grows: an Easter post at The Lent Project


Today, I'm over at Biola University's Lent Project, writing about Jesus meeting Mary Magdalene in a garden:

Even when we did find our way into gardens, and were refreshed by the common graces of sunlight and rain, we dragged with us our cloud of pollution, dimming the light and poisoning the ground. 
There was light, but it did not purify. Fruit, but it did not assuage our bottomless hunger. Water, but it could not quench our endless thirst. 
Then the Son of God became Man. 
He was light, and no pollution could abide in His brightness. 
He became the food that could truly feed us, and He Himself was the living water—the water that could flow over the dead lands and call life out of them once more. 
He took our sin upon Himself, and burned it all away.


Please head on over to The Lent Project to read the rest.


And if you're interested in reading more about how to celebrate Easter (and the rest of the church year) in your home, consider picking up Let Us Keep the Feast!



Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell






This post contains Amazon affiliate links; if you purchase a book from this link, I receive a small percentage of the purchase price.  (See full disclosure on sidebar of my blog.)

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Mini Reviews: The Books I Read in March 2017

--I'm catching up on my book notes, taking them a month at a time. Since I'm behind, I'm only allowing myself a line or two on each book. I hope they still give you an idea of whether or not these would be books you'd enjoy picking up yourself!--



-"What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast: And Two Other Short Guides to Achieving More at Work and at Home," by Laura Vanderkam. This is a compilation of three short e-books. I don't share Vanderkam's optimism about how many things can be accomplished in one short weekend or morning, but I still appreciate her novel and hopeful way of looking at the number of hours we are all given in our days and weeks.



-"Eleanor and Park," by Rainbow Rowell. I listened to this one on audiobook. Beautifully and compellingly written, as Rowell's work always is. But I didn't enjoy it, mostly because the heroine's home life is so (legitimately, realistically) bleak and depressing. I also wouldn't pass it on to a teenager, b/c of the level of (probably also legitimate and realistic) sensuality. But beautifully done, all the same.



-"The Masqueraders," by Georgette Heyer. This was my favorite Heyer for a long, long time. ("Sylvester, Or, The Wicked Uncle" has since supplanted it from the top spot, but just barely.)

This romance, full of adventure and derring-do, disguise and weariness of disguise, a slow-burning friendship turned into passion, and one of the happiest and most harmonious sibling relationships I've ever seen in fiction, remains one of my very favorite stories. Prudence and her "mountain" win me over every time.



-"How to Manage Your Home Without Losing Your Mind: Dealing with Your House's Dirty Little Secrets," by Dana K. White. Lots of housekeeping books say they're for people who aren't naturally good at housekeeping.

This one actually is.




-"The Hobbit," by J. R. R. Tolkien. Just finished listening through this with Adam and the kids. Delightful, as always.



-"Busman's Honeymoon," by Dorothy L. Sayers. It was my first time making it through this--which is shocking, given my love for "Gaudy Night"!  But l always stalled after the delightful exchange of letters at the beginning of the book. Still, I'm glad I've read it now, and next time I can revisit it with pleasure, knowing that while it might be a bit uneven, it has all the charm and interest and deep feeling I've come to expect from Sayers' accounts of Lord Peter and Harriet.

(Also





--SPOILER ALERT--




the ghosts! Why did I never know about the ghosts???)




Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell





This post contains Amazon affiliate links; if you purchase a book from this link, I receive a small percentage of the purchase price.  (See full disclosure on sidebar of my blog.)


Monday, April 10, 2017

Weekly Links - Holy Week edition

~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING, too late for the weekend, but perfect for a monday ~



-"Thoughts on the 'Benedict Option' - a Lament": Dr. Peters' point? Don't write a book about the Benedictines and get the monasticism wrong. 


-"10 Things You Should Know About the Trinity": This whole thing is good, but I especially appreciate point #8.


-"The Death of the Levite's Concubine":
Once having choked it down, you’re left wondering, as with the whole rest of Judges, who exactly the good guy is. 


-"Three Myths of Cohabitation": interview with a sociologist who just completed a very interesting study. A snippet:

Generally speaking, the least educated married families in Europe enjoy more stability than the most educated cohabiting families. That’s not what I would have guessed.


-"Stop Hating on Christian Popular Culture": now here's a challenge for our modern age!


-"Celebrating the Feast of the Anunnciation": I'm a few weeks late on this one, but I really appreciate this piece, and I think it's a good meditation for Holy Week:
This year I had several friends who faced the death of a loved one right at Christmas time.  They had no choice but to grieve and celebrate in the same breath. These sorts of emotional juxtapositions always be gut retchingly difficult. Yet living year by year through the liturgical seasons we are offered a foretaste of the multi-dimensional nature of our emotional life.  In following the seasons we are encouraged to explore the depths of our own souls in both joy and sorrow, to bring our hearts before God, and to align ourselves with the life of the church. When triumph is followed by disaster we have a sense of the path to take, we have walked it and we know where to fix our eyes. In the darkness of the tomb we wait for the light of resurrection.



-"Sushi Saturdays": My eldest daughter and I are the only people in the house who love sushi, and we're determined that this experiment is the perfect activity for Bright Week this year.


-"Researchers Have Transformed a Spinach Leaf into Working Heart Tissue": wow!


-"The Impossible Novel that Became IMPOSSIBLE SAINTS"I follow Clarissa Harwood on Twitter, and enjoyed reading this long version of her first novel sale, especially her honesty when she said:
In hindsight I can see that I was far too close to Novel #2 to see it clearly enough to revise it. I invested too much of myself in it, but that’s also why it was such a joy to write. It was everything a first draft should be: too long, repetitive, self-indulgent, and confusing. In other words, what was an utter delight to write was a complete nightmare to read.




I hope you have a good and blessed Holy Week!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell














Friday, April 7, 2017

Mini Reviews: The Books I Read in February 2017

--I'm catching up on my book notes, taking them a month at a time. Since I'm behind, I'm only allowing myself a line or two on each book. I hope they still give you an idea of whether or not these would be books you'd enjoy picking up yourself!--



-"The Zoo Job (Leverage #2)," by Keith R. A. Candido. I didn't enjoy this as much as the first Leverage novel, but it was still a fun read. No need for any explicit content warnings that I recall, but just the kind of normal language and such you might expect on a network drama.



-"Unf*ck Your Habitat: You're Better Than Your Mess," by Rachel Hoffman. This one clearly deserves a language warning! If that doesn't bug you, though, there's some good stuff here, especially for people dealing with mental or physical disabilities, who still want to live in a decent home. The author clearly comes from a different philosophical/political/theological viewpoint that I do, but her practical suggestions are brilliantly helpful, and I love her down-to-earth version of advice-giving.



-"The Corinthian," by Georgette Heyer. This was such a fun reread, because I was a lot younger last time I read this. When I read it through this time, I picked up on so much subtle humor that totally went over my head before. Heyer has so much fun in this one. She never tells you what the hero is thinking, not explicitly, but she doesn't have to, because it's all there in the action and dialogue.

Heyer is just so good.


Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell



This post contains Amazon affiliate links; if you purchase a book from this link, I receive a small percentage of the purchase price.  (See full disclosure on sidebar of my blog.)

Monday, April 3, 2017

Mini Reviews: The Books I Read in January 2017

--I'm catching up on my book notes, taking them a month at a time. Since I'm behind, I'm only allowing myself a line or two on each book. I hope they still give you an idea of whether or not these would be books you'd enjoy picking up yourself!--



-"Have His Carcase," by Dorothy L. Sayers. In which our hero and heroine alternately romance each other and get cranky at each other. Featuring a lovely coastline walk I'd love to take, minus the murder. Delightful, as always. (Lord Peter and Harriet Vane 4Ever.)



-"Murder Must Advertise," by Dorothy L. Sayers. Of the Lord Peter Wimsey books which do NOT feature Harriet Vane, I'd put this or "The Nine Tailors" at the top of the heap. Seeing Lord Peter go undercover in not just one, but two! roles...it's a thing of beauty. Please read this. It's marvelous.




-"The Con Job (Leverage #1)," by Matt Forbeck. Great fun if you're a fan of the show. The "Con" of the title is Comic Con in San Diego, making this a con pulled at a con--a happy thought that justifies the book's entire existence. The author has so much fun with the combination of these characters in that setting, and I had a great time reading it. Cautions for the sort of language and situations you'd expect to find on a network television drama.



-"Gaudy Night," by Dorothy L. Sayers. The best of novels. What else can I say?  Well, this, I guess: after reading it through this time around, I found myself telling my sister-in-law, "Every time I read this, I copy out more quotations from it. Eventually I'm going to have retyped this book word-for-word onto a document on my computer."



-"Christmas at Thompson Hall and Other Christmas Stories," by Anthony Trollope. Not my favorite of Trollope's work, but I enjoyed dipping into this bit of Victorian fiction over the holidays. The story set in the United States during the Civil War was especially interesting. (It's always interesting to read treatments of America by foreign visitors.)


Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell


This post contains Amazon affiliate links; if you purchase a book from this link, I receive a small percentage of the purchase price.  (See full disclosure on sidebar of my blog.)

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Weekly Links!

(not really)


~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING AND WATCHING, FOR WHAT'S LEFT OF YOUR WEEKEND ~



-"Why Pray for the Dead?": On the difference between praying for and with the saints, vs. praying to the saints.


-"9 Ways to Pastor Those Longing for Marriage": so much better than most things I read on this subject, honestly.


(Quick sidebar: If you're talking about singleness in the Christian life, and you're not taking into account the fact that we're all following a Man who never married during His earthly life, you're really not talking about it properly.)



-"The Hollywood Executive and the Hand Transplant That Changed His Life": if you like reading about fascinating medical stories (I do!), you'll love this.




-Finally, this is all good, but I really appreciated the second half, where they get into the difference between "How does the reality of the Trinity have an impact on your prayer life?" and "How does your awareness/knowledge of the Trinity have an impact on your prayer life?"

God is very gracious to us, meeting with us and listening to us, despite our (fathomless) ignorance.







I hope you have a lovely Sunday, full of worship and rest!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Weekly Links

From a lunchtime walk last week.


A quick note before I get to the links: if you're a regular here, you've probably noticed that my blogging has decreased sharply. That's because, as I wrote here, I've changed my habits significantly in this new year, most especially by taking off my editor hat for awhile in order to concentrate on my writing.

And I have been writing, mostly on a novel, although I have a few non-fiction assignments I've been working on too.

The result of all this non-blog writing is that, when I turn to my poor, neglected blog at the end of the day, I find that I don't have many words left. 

I think this will change soon--I'm taking lots of notes for posts I want to write!--but for now I'm just going to keep putting up these Sunday links posts. I love sharing good writing and interesting stories. I hope you'll stick around for the links and, eventually, for some more original work from yours truly.

Okay, now onto the good stuff!


~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING AND WATCHING, FOR WHAT'S LEFT OF YOUR WEEKEND ~



-"Are You Fighting the New Greed?" - on technology addiction





-"The Benedict Option: What It Is and Isn't": the always-helpful Karen Swallow Prior, on the book of the moment.



-"What Will You Do? You Must Read to Lead"




-"Professing to be Wise, They Became LeFous": Linking to this especially for this good point that I've not seen anyone making elsewhere:

Disney...had to go and act like this story only exists to preach a bad sermon. This is worse than the most moralistic Christian films.











I hope you have a lovely Sunday, full of worship and rest!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Weekly Links!



~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING and WATCHING, FOR WHAT'S LEFT OF YOUR WEEKEND ~



FAITH

-"The Story of Those Little Communion Cups, Whatever Those Are Technically Called"


-"10 Reasons to Love Lent"


-"If Literature's Biggest Romantics Could Text" - the Odysseus one!


-"God's Omniscience as Law and Gospel": worth listening to:






FAmily

-"Solving the Autism Puzzle": This article from MIT Technology Review has research I haven't read elsewhere. You might be interested.




Fiction

-"Think Like a Pirate" - a very useful podcast episode, for you authors out there.


-"The Mad Truth of 'La-La Land'": I haven't seen this yet, but this review makes me want to see it more than ever.


-"How 'Weird Al' Eclipsed Almost Every Star He Ever Parodied": Not fiction, but art, so I'm putting it here.




I hope you have a lovely Sunday, full of worship and rest!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Weekly Links!



~ LINKS TO SOME INTERESTING READING & WATCHING, FOR WHAT'S LEFT OF YOUR WEEKEND ~



Faith

-"What Is Gospel Fluency?"


-"Embracing Valentine's Day Disappointment"


-"A Just Silence"This was helpful to me, especially as I've been thinking recently about how I do (vs. how I should) use social media.


-"Submit to the New Sexual Orthodoxy or Risk Losing Everything"

Family

-"A Simple Way to Speed Delivery": Somehow, this just reminds me of HOW HUNGRY I WAS after I delivered my first child.

Fiction

-"Painting a Story"


-"Why Don't We Talk About 'Stranger Than Fiction' Nearly Enough?": I love this movie.


-"Sunny Day": not fiction, but a good poem, worth reading.


-2016 Novelist Income Survey Results, Part One, and Part Two




I hope you have a lovely Sunday, full of worship and rest!

Peace of Christ to you,
Jessica Snell